Medical Malpractice: Can a Law Firm Help Me Manage My Money?

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Our goal at Grossman Roth Yaffa Cohen is to resolve your medical malpractice case in the most satisfactory way possible and get you the justice you deserve. A successful lawsuit will result in a monetary recovery.

One of the most common questions we’re asked by those clients is: “Can you help me manage my money?” While the short answer is “no,” our team will play a very important role in ensuring your recovery is protected to help you and your family begin the next chapter of your lives with peace of mind.

For example, in cases when a minor or an incapacitated person* wins a recovery directly, or when a minor is the beneficiary of a parent’s estate that brings the claim, the judge will not approve that settlement unless their legal team proves the money will be secure. In these situations, our attorneys will work directly with our firm’s network of seasoned wealth management experts and estate and trust professionals to develop a plan to protect your assets in the best way possible.

Because each lawsuit has its own set of challenges and complexities, there can be questions and concerns you or your loved ones have, even after the trial has ended. As discussed here, and in another post I wrote about post-trial recoveries, these questions are often financial in nature.

In addition, if our team secures a settlement on your behalf, we will also connect you with the right experts, so you can protect your money for the rest of your life. While we’re not financial advisors, our job is to give you the best legal counsel possible by guiding you through every step of your case, from beginning to end.

If you or somebody you love is seeking representation for medical malpractice cases and needs assistance, Grossman Roth Yaffa Cohen can help. Check out our practice areas page to see what our teams specialize in and fill out the form at the bottom of our home page, or call +1 (888) 296-1681 for a free consultation.

(*NOTE: Not everyone can bring a case on behalf of a deceased relative. Read here to find out who can.)