Orthopedic Medical Malpractice

As a medical malpractice firm with decades of experience, we understand that orthopedic medical negligence can lead to permanent harm and/or require a lifetime of specialized care.

If you or a loved one have undergone an knee replacement or other orthopedic procedure that resulted in significant injury, amputation or death, you may have an orthopedic medical malpractice case. For a free consultation of your case contact Grossman Roth Yaffa Cohen or call 1 (888) 296 – 1681. Our Florida medical malpractice lawyers can help.

*The results obtained by the Firm in these cases are representative only, and there is no guarantee that future cases will yield similar results. The amounts set forth above are before deductions for attorneys’ fees and costs.

Results

A Punta Gorda, Florida woman in her forties visited an ear, nose, and throat specialist for a check-up due to fatigue. After performing a brief examination, the doctor at the facility recommended that she undergo parathyroid surgery, however he did not order the necessary radiological scan that determines which side of her neck should be operated on. Without that information available, the surgeon began on the wrong side of her neck and did not realize his error until they were well into the procedure. When the surgeon opened the other side of her neck to re-operate, he injured the nerve that controlled her vocal cords in the process, leaving her with permanent speaking issues. She sued the doctor and received a seven-figure verdict that led to a confidential settlement.

A woman in her sixties was brought to a hospital in Lee County, Florida after she slipped and fell, injuring her leg and causing severe pain. During her treatment, the hospital staff failed to notice that the impact had caused a blood clot behind her knee, that was restricting circulation to the rest of her leg. Over time, the untreated clot cut off blood flow to the point where her leg was beyond saving and needed amputation. If the staff had discovered the clot in the ER or upon admission, the amputation would not have been necessary. She now requires a prosthetic for the rest of her life, and she received a seven-figure settlement from the hospital as recourse.